State of Reverie at Wild Joe’s

“Growing up I remember a teacher telling me daydreaming was bad … and only ditzy people daydream.” Ellen Kuntz said. A former student and senator at MSU is sharing her passion for daydreaming. Her art show, State of Reverie, is currently on display at Wild Joe’s Coffee on Main Street Kuntz said, “Reverie was the inspiration for Reverie. Every one of my photos has a daydream behind it.”

The show was put up at Wild Joe’s on Monday and the photos will be up for about two months, according to Kuntz. The opening reception will be held Friday, March 28 from 7 – 9 p.m., with live music by Montana native, Kimberly Pierson. The show and reception are free and open to the public.

Along with the photos, there is a Reverie installation; “It’s an interactive art piece where the viewer is encouraged to take a selfie of themselves daydreaming.”  Viewers can upload their photos via Instagram and Tumblr with the hashtag #stateofreverie. They can also email them to stateofreverieproject@gmail.com. On Friday night, Kuntz will be taking photos of participants, photo booth style. She said, “I will be doing a photo booth for State of Reverie, so totally come down and have your picture taken.” Afterward, the photos will be available to participants. In a Facebook invitation she wrote, “Let’s update those profile pictures, people!”

According to Kuntz, she doesn’t know yet what she will do with the selfies, “It depends on how many people participate. My goal is to have enough selfies to do a gallery showing of everyone.” Along with the photo installation, Kuntz set up a “reverie box” for participants to submit their daydreams.

Her goal is for guests to reflect on themselves, “The show is all self-portraits, and in each portrait series I play a different character emotion. While shooting the photographs I would ‘summon’ certain emotions while also reflecting on myself. My hope would be that viewers would gather their own emotions and reflect on themselves.”

Reverie is different from a lot of other photography projects. Kuntz explains, “The show is special [because of] the nature in which the photos were made. Not only from daydreams but also completely alone. All the self-portraits you will see at Reverie were shot by me using a tripod, and a remote. Nobody was with me.”

When asked why Kuntz chose to take the photos alone, she said, “I prefer to be alone because I can get into my ‘zone’. Also, it’s super awkward to have someone watch you take nudes in a church … just sayin’.”

Photographs from State of Reverie, as well as other photo projects, can be found on Kuntz’ website, ellenkuntzphotography.com. Look for the follow-up article — a review of Friday’s opening reception — in the April 3 edition of The Exponent.